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assumed. guest: we are in non-partisan grass-roots organization devoted to educating the public about fiscal issues. guest: if we go over the cliff, it is not the end of the discussion. it is important people and not lose hope -- that people not lose hope for justice in what happens by midnight is the end of the discussion. the discussions will go on. i am relatively sure if we do not have a deal by december 31, there will be one in january. the damage to the economy would be too great. the public outcry will be significant i will be looking at the dow and s&p. those will get daily responses. host: we can talk more about the deals down the road. let's go to louann on the republican line. caller: to me, the fiscal cliff is a small smokescreen. the fiscal cliff that is coming is obamacare. nobody is addressing obamacare. i have to find out friday will be taxed 2.3% on any device used on us in any of the medical fields. my husband's doctor wrote out a prescription for a blood drop for january. he said i do not know how much this will cost you out of pocket because of obamacare. my husban
education and jobs and surl celebration and bring to you jesse jackson who will speak to you and how we pay the price for peace in this city. [applause] >> amos, are you presenting me with the quilt? i want my quilt. i want my quilt. i am delighted to be here with you today. so many years ago i met -- dr. king and i went to minnesota and reverend amos was then pastoring in minnesota before the snow chased him to san francisco and knew dr. king and his father and had a class in moore house of seven students. dr. brown and members of the class and knew them before and before then and he brings a lean yaj of struggle to the table every time he speaks with tremendous morale authority and stroke couldn't stop him for fight wg great power. [applause] i want to thank mayor ed lee for convening the family. for all the times we think of leading from the front. often you lead from the center. you have the power to convene the family, to look at a family crisis and think it through, and it figure it out, and if we can get out of our own's self way we might find solutions to a problem that is
's education. people say that federal loans have card caps of $5,000-$7,000 per year. you can only borrow a total of $33,000 for undergrad. but that is not looking at the parent portion of the picture. the parent portion allows you to borrow as much as you need, to fill the unmet need, to pay your child's way to get to a particular school. there is a credit check that is very modest and there is not a check on income. but as costs have grown, perhaps the limits we have had on federal student loans do not meet the needs the students and families are experiencing when they are trying to pay for college. you see the growth in the program where more parents are borrowing from this program. recipients have doubled in the past decade, and they are borrowing more money as well. we thought it was emblematic of the shift in the system. >> would you say the apparent lack of paycheck is one of the most consistent missing pieces? if someone has an income of $10,000 a year, they can take out a loan for $30,000. >> if they do not have a negative credit history, and we could have a larger conversation a
will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccollum, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that something is up and they are usually right. sometimes we go fo
charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
that the education system must instill the value of strong minds and that brings strong change. take your child to school. meet your child's teachers. exchange numbers. turn the tv off at night. take a report card every nine weeks and take your child to religious celebration once a week. most of the violence is from the bottom up, not top down. mothers say something like "i'm going to beat you boy. i'm going to beat you so the police don't have to do it one day". it was their own way of saying get some home training, some home cultivation is a big fact in the social order and we must restore homes but unemployed parents don't do as good job as parents with jobs. i'm all about welfare back to work. there are four steps involved. one the parents must have day care. if you leave the child without day care you're called an unfit parent and are arrested. you need day care. you need transportation and job training and a job. you need those four steps. what gives you an advantage in san francisco with the mayor across the bay and mayor lee here you have leaders that care. we have leaders h
i came home, he does, so and he had all that information because he had an educated family who knew what was happening, knew what he was going through, knew what to look for, and where to send him. very good. mike. well, and i think one of the things was just brought up is, is the other side of a very positive coin, meaning that there are lots of programs out there now in a position to help. but one of the things you hear from veterans and military families over and over again is there is so much out there that they become overwhelmed. there are so many programs, there is so much information that it really becomes a challenge, um, trying to identify what the right channel of support is for their particular issue, their particular problem. kathryn in, in terms of substance use disorder and mental health issues, behavioral health issues, what is important for families to know and, and how can they help the service member? obviously, jen experienced and, and she's not an isolated case. um, well, i think that the most important thing is for people to, as barbara suggested, to get educat
education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. toda
morning. thank you for educating people on your television show. we live in a community where we are experiencing exactly what you're talking about, particularly businesses, and i am talking big businesses. they do not like where the doors are located, or this department over here, and what they are doing is restricting jobs and tax base. i would encourage people to get involved in your institute and fight this because it is not doing anything for the economy or our country. merry christmas to everybody. host: john, thank you for the call. what is the history of the cato institute, founded in 1977? guest: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin
was six-years old. he was a special education uden hisaren issd a statement. we take great solace that dylan died in the loving arms of his favorite teacher, the special education teacher, anne marie murphy. the teachers in that school, the principal, psychologist, the teachers that die protecting their children, saving their children, comforting their children, those who survived, they are true heroes and they have not received the recognition, in my judgment, that they deserve. i point out that every one of them is a public-school teacher, a group that has been condemned, vilified, and denigrated by all sorts of people. >> do wonderbout ts nes we are making about mental illness and violence. we have had a number of gun violence in the district of columbia where people have been killed by firearms, prince george's county as well. are you suggesting to me that everyone who pulled a trigger is mentally ill? is that the suggestion? >> no. >> in mass killings, if you look at the virginia tech guide, and jared loughner, he was diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic, which you could see
in a position of accepting really unacceptable risks to our security, title 1 programs of education for low-income children will be cut dramatically, most people, including the congressional budget office, our own congressional budget office, say that the combination of tax increases along with the decreased spending required under the budget control act will push our economy back into recession in the new year. so i don't agree that no deal is better than a bad deal. in this case, i repeat, no deal is the worst deal because it allows our country to go over the fiscal cliff and really hurts almost every american family in our country, in our economy, as a whole. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. it's not as if, if i could use the metaphor, that congress was going along in a bus and -- on a ride through the country and suddenly came to the end of the road and there was a cliff. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. we -- we -- we created this cliff ourselves a year and a half ago when we adopted the budget control act. and we created it for a very good reason: because we knew that we had pro
this stuff also about the educational stuff like the policy-making situations which i'm very interested in. it's a great thing washington, d.c. has all these things and c-span has covered it. >> c-span created by america's cable companies in 1979 luft. >>> president obama meets with house and senate leaders from both parties this afternoon at the white house that meeting is scheduled for 3:00 eastern in the oval office. politico rights leader's side is hopeful there will be a breakthrough on preventing the tax increases and spending cuts scheduled to take effect on january 1st. earlier today senator tom harkin held and even outside of the capitol about the fiscal cliff. he called it a battle for the middle class. we will also hear from congressman chris van hollen and members of advocacy groups. >> are we ready? okay. good morning. all right. good morning. welcome to this cold morning press conference here outside of the senate office building. i am the executive director of network and i am one of them on the bus. we're here to continue the message, grizzlies to find a solution to the eco
as a way to afford a college education, but the real education she received was in iraq where on march 23rd, 2003, her convoy took a wrong turn and was ambushed by iraqis, she was captured and became the first american p.o.w. to be successfully rescued since world war ii. >> on april 1st, 2003, a special army special forces, rescue jumpers, army rangers and navy seals landed in iraq. the mission, to take home jessica lynch. they entered the hospital where she was being held, and found her. >> where do the windows go out to? >> it's okay. >> lynch was suffering from mental distress and severe physical injuries, including several broken bones. within seven minutes of the first american boots hitting the ground, lynch was on a helicopter headed for much needed medical attention. after nine days in captivity, her nightmare was over. >> you're doing wonderful, okay? >> welcome back. >> her rescue-- (applause) >> indeed her rescue launched the news coverage and she was a hero. she says she's not going to take credit for something she tonight do and survived herself simply as a survivor. would yo
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
mother and father through months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond hill georgia and the surroundisurroundi ng areas welcomes matthew home with tears, flags and staff salute. the streets were lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing it has memorial service at the methodist church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout, a local boy scout troop honored him by collecting pens and papers and sending them to mattheus unit map these unit in afghanistan. a dear friend who was involved in the media had a fission and the project began. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film on memorial day 2010. since then with the help of so many volunteers, and i can't name them all, that project has sent over seven tons of school supplies to our soldiers and marines in humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthews small town of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the
clash joined. and the real education she received was in iraq where in march 23rd, her convoy took a wrong turn and ambushed by iraqis. she was captured and became the first american p.o.w. to be successfully rescued since world war ii . on april 1st, 2003 a special operation raid of u.s. army forces and army rangers and navy seals landed in iraq, the mission to take home private jessica lynch . at 1:00 they entered the iraq hospital and after securing the location they found lynch. >> are you in pain. it is okay, lynch was suffering from mental distress and severe physical energies and within minutes. lynch was on a helicopter headed for much needed medical attention and after nine days in captivity her nightmare was over. >> you are doing wonderful. >> welcome back. >> her rescue. [ applause ] >> her rescue received a lot of news coverage and she was portrayed as a hero. she will not take credit and described herself simply as a survivor. please welcome a hero to me, jessica lynch. so good to have you here. [ applause ] every time i see the video, i get choked up. how old were yo
? that's ahead. >>> plus, forget about a college education. why the oil fields of america are now attracting the young. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> gold prices closing right now. let's get to bertha coombs. >> gold closing fractionally higher, on track for its twelfth yearly gain, smallest since 2008 because it's been a very tough quarter for gold. despite the fact we've had all these worries, whether it be the fiscal cliff, the election, the situation in europe. nonetheless, gold has just not been the safe haven. this morning, it was industrial metals that got a boost as we saw rallies in asia on hopes that maybe this new regime in china is going to be spending more
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has ground. n.ese are -- has grown a these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for its. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and yo
him to take on this mission, he had already had sort of a graduate level education if you will in howards are fought in the desert and that separated him in many ways from his four star contemporaries who were mainly back in those days focused on fighting the war in europe. >> harris: for people just joining us, general norman schwarzkopf has died. he led operation desert shield and desert storm which were the largest deployments of u.s. forces and equipment since the vietnam war and general scales you just mentioned president george h.w. bush is ailing in the hospital but we have just gotten a statement from the former president and i want to share it with our viewers if you are still with us. the former president says "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american patriot and one of the great mill tare leaders of our generation. hailing from westpoint. general norman schwarzkopf to me epitomized the service the dallesty creed that served our great nation through this trying natural crises. a good and decent man and a good friend. barbara and i send our condolences to h
, the failure to educate, and i think that weighs on our conscience, but that is not justification for a war, and it certainly does not meet the test -- >> i believe i read somewhere that there were talking about giving women a break, the taliban. >> we do not know. if we had left some years ago if al qaeda would have come back in some real way. you cannot prove that. >> syria -- how did the united states, the government, the administration handles syria? appropriately, and appropriately, enough, not enough? >> the good thing about afghanistan and iraq wars is that key wheat -- they are keeping us out of syria. we are war-wary. then a serious is a disaster. it is a country with a huge stockpile of chemical weapons. we have allowed the saudis and the qatari to arm the rebels, and they are people who are on the islamists, so the islamists now have the upper hand among the rebels. the west did not do anything comparable with the non-islamic opposition. we are looking at possible country that would divide into three or four, like yugoslavia, or could become 80 hottest -- and syria is a serious c
inevitability -- that we withdraw, that they will revert to the punishment of women, failure to educate, and i think that weighs on our conscience. that is not justification for a war. >> i believe i read somewhere that they are talking about giving women a break, the taliban. >> we do not know. if we had left some years ago if al qaeda would have come back. you cannot prove that. >> all right, syria. how did the united states, how did the government, how did the administration handled syria? appropriately? and appropriately? enough? not enough? >> the good thing about the afghanistan and iraq forces that they are keeping us out of syria. >> syria could become a disaster. this is a country with a huge stockpile of chemical weapons, which are pretty active. we have allowed the saudis and qataris to arm the rebels, and those are the people who have armed the islamists, so the islamists now have the upper hand among the rebels. the west -- the british and french and we and the turks -- did not do anything comparable with the non-islamic opposition. we are looking at a possible country that would
without some investment in infrastructure or education and the like, our recovery may falter and then given what is going on in europe and much of the world, that would be bad news. i think the number one job is to keep us on good, sound, fiscal standing and he has to deal with some of these outstanding issues. then you move on and you start to see things like education and how we deal with education in this country and the need for reform continues to be out there. working with the education secretary, it is going to occupy a bitter moment for this president. americans believe in education and of the it is the first step on that ladder to upward mobility. that is going to be a challenge that this president has to deal with them than he has to find these issues and then define them in terms of common ground. host: juan williams joining us on this christmas day. joining us from texas, this is ken. go ahead. caller: good morning. merry christmas. i live in texas. the people in east texas -- i don't mean to say it, but white people really do not like this president. you can list
for months and years. i make plans for education in 2001 for the dutch government. i always follow something for inspiration. i saw last time that the democrats and republicans, the parties, they are working so good together to make something happen. host: you think the fiscal cliff debate is a good sign for the country? caller: absolutely, it is a good sign for the country. you know, america does not need money. america is money. america needs jobs. what kind of jobs? american jobs. what is on american jobs? to do the best and to bring the best things. that is the mayor, -- the america that i see. i seek some unity. i travel around the world. i see some the young americans everywhere. they become the best. host: from manitoba, canada, thank you so much for calling in. a few other stories we want to run through for you -- we will continue this discussion into the next segment. here is the story on federal workers getting a pay raise -- another story at what point you to, this from "the new york times" -- one other story i wanted to point out this morning, this from the new york daily news --
a foundation that helps troops returning home ret pay for education costs. >> the focus really is on the the men and women, the veterans and the spouses that we provide it's scholarships for and it's about futures men and their futures much more what so than about what happened in the past. marie's >> reporter: but marie's journey also also contains a second love story. she's now remarried to joe shenten, a chicago businessman.ssman. tell me about joe. >> tell >> he is probably the best he i surprise in my life so far. i didn't think that -- i wasn't n't looking to be in another relationship.nk i didn't think that i would ever w find someone like him. and and he is able to embrace all of these things my past my life my l pat and to love all of them and th to love me just for who i am. it's and it's been this great gift t that he's given me. >> reporter: i walked in here i today and joe is wearing a pat and tilman hat. a he still plays a large role in >> your new lives. >> he does. >> >> reporter: and everyone's c comfortable with that? that. >> yeah it's
was educated at yale university and yale law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the awful immediacy of his war experiences made him a man who was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of war, he worked as "newsweek" magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr. who asked him to manage the merchandise mart in chicago. during those chicago years, he married the boss' daughter, eunice, in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board and the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city's schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon led to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served as kennedy's chair for illinois and also headed the campaign's civil rights division. in that capacity late in the campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone coret
bureaucracy could get in the way. >> from for profit education, my money, my future, it's gone. >> reporter: to faulty foreclosures. >> for me they happen quickly. [ wrong tape ] >> that obviously was the wrong story. the city does -- has spent nearly $1 million already this year on police consultants. they hope to help the backlog of internal affairs investigations. william bratton and his security consultant group is scheduled to start in oakland next month. >> is this a one-year deal? it's a contract that they have signed with bratton
board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you take if the chinese history. >> to see it through the other rise in? >> but he said with gap what we said looks to the russians obamacare has some of that ability. >> talk about obama. your chapter is entitled provocatively. [laughter] in some ways they've made it worse. >> the longest chapter of the book. >> it might get longer. >> then i see the cuts that we have to make but to deal with a contemporary is a lot of interest in obama. then to pull back. >> but there were people on the right to and those who would disagree to say he apologizes for america and pulls out from the allies and those that say he should not send t
a second wind and this was in the education of general david petraeus by paula broadwell. any comments on those books? >> it is funny refer to that book as a poorly amid this title about a second wind because after general david petraeus administration, that is exactly why her book got the second wind and why the paperback publication was pushed up. what it has done a little bit though is take away from the larger aspect of these books. when scandal rears its head, one focus is too much on that instead of the substance of the book. one thing worth pointing out especially in relation to the mark cohen and mark cohen was a pseudonym for one of the navy seals who was involved in the mission to kill osama bin laden, the book's publisher which is penguin press, they announced with only weeks to spare, i felt they did a very brilliant job of marketing that book. it didn't help or perhaps didn't hurt depending on who you ask that mark owens's real name was dutifully revealed by the media which than cost its own fire storm and the like but the upshot is many of these books with commensurate mi
this other thing that we haven't even thought about. i feel like there could he and education, sort of guide to how we would put recruitment strategies or how to use them as a tool in other fields? >> i think you're absolutely right in that is why had done this thing up diving. i've been involved with politics since i was 16 and i go juan iranian television and they go on saudi television discussing world affairs. i also do american television on a radio station talking about world affairs. why? these things are all related. mass behavior among parts having relationship to mass behavior among human beings doesn't make that massive behavior predictable because the mass of behavior builds behavior considerably. it builds on repulsion but in recognizing the commonalities lies a hint of the solution and if you read my first book the lucifer principle, the forces of history, you will see ideas like this applied in ways that relate directly to geopolitics and to economics and if you read my second book global brain, the office from the secretary of defense thought that book was so relevant to thes
have read of the book. [inaudible] equipment of an education. schooling, anything at all, anything outside the koran is -- [inaudible] it is very easy to mobilize the youth who sit at the feet of the moon law at the schools and to take orders, who believe that [inaudible]. of the cleric in charge. the politics of nigeria became complicated, simply because of something the british did. they were not satisfied. there had to be dissension, division in the sense of the political power in the country. so when the british left, before the left they created -- [inaudible] and naturally they wanted closest to their viable or already practicing a kind of structure, which is close to what the british practice at the time until later in the year. and so they not only falsified the elections that followed, preceded independence. they falsified even consensus. now, if you check the annals of home office, so-called home office, which is where the colonies are ministered, look for the book of harold smith was one of the civil service in nigeria at the time. he was in the white house and he got in
and initiatives that help shape education technology over the past generation. senator rockefeller, who was privileged to work with on so many issues, with doggedly determined to enact this benchmark initiative. in typical fashion, he was not going to take no for an answer which made us it perfect coauthors as i was equally determined. by working with members of both parties were willing to judge on the merits, we overcame the hurdles and the program was born. during the 2001 tax debate, senator blanche lincoln and i, as members of the finance committee, joined together to increase the amount of the child tax credit and make it refundable so that they could still benefit from the credit. ultimately, the measure was enacted becoming the second refundable tax credit ever and in ensuring the child tax credit would exist with an additional 13 million more children and with 500,000 of them out of poverty. madam president, i also think about my friend, senator landrieu, sitting in the chamber roswell and how we formed the senate common ground coalition again to rekindle cross-party relations.
leaders failed to reach an agreement with the nation's third largest school district over education reforms sought by chicago mayor rahm emanuel. >> we will walk the picket lines, we will talk to parents, clergy, we will demand a fair contract today. we demand a fair contract now. >> the protests in yemen and egypt on the tuesday night's storming of the u.s. consulate in benghazi. u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three other staff members were killed in the attack. >> there are 47% of people who are with the president, who believe they are victims, who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them, who believe they are entitled to health care, food, housing. in titled, that the government should give it to them. >> welcome to a taste of the run the economy. that is a message on the banner that greets you here at this tent city where we are broadcasting from, two hours west of chicago in between wisconsin and iowa, two swing states. this in canton was set up by workers who are faced with losing their livelihoods when the factory across the street from us closes
explain what brown vs. board of education was was about. even though the answer was implicit in the question. so our kids don't know much history, and a lot of what they know is wrong. and so if the book is based upon the work of great historians. you're mentioned and a lot of historians doing similar work. but we have a big sweep, and because we're able to couple this with the showtime documentary, able to make it more dramatic. >> tried to make it a primer. like a basic text, like history 101. why can it not be? i have to say when you read these history books, it's not -- it's not coherent. there's no pattern so we don't see what we were just talking about, the empirement you don't understand how that works and the kids get the dates and the pictures but don't -- the united states always comes out ahead, always comes out okay. we can trash iraq twice. >> if you look -- if you take chinese history in china, and -- >> global history to see it through russian eyes, chinese eyes, french eyes. >> basically what is unique he saw the world not just through u.s. eyes, wallace said,
. arizona's attorney general proposing to change the state law that would allow an educator in each school to carry a gun. the "l.a. times," the city of los angeles collected more than -- this story is unbelievable. they collected more than 2,000 firearms part of a guns for groceries buyback program. 75 assault weapons were included in that and two rocket launchers were turned in for cash. >> they got steak and shrimp for the rocket launchers. what about teachers with guns in classrooms? >> i mean, it's amazing to me. i had randy wine gart ten of the american federation of teachers on my show last night. it's outrageous to me on two levels. one, you're going to put more guns into schools it to try to deal with getting guns out of the school. you don't have money for students. you don't have money for sports and arts. you don't have money for anything you need in school, but you're going to find money to buy guns, bullets and training for teachers? where did the conservatives come up with this money from? how, if you had an armed teacher, would that have solved newtown? it would have made t
to bring together a diverse group of people to build operations in the state's public education and road shows over the coming months to talk about this to hear different voices, to get different people around a table talking about this. we have been lucky to have so much support in a bipartisan way, i believe is the only way we will get this job done. host: let me share a couple comments from our social media the deadline is today. guest: >> there's extraordinary measures. >> this is what it looks like. let's go to betty from carson, kansas, republican line. caller: good morning. thank you for c-span. i've been at this for many, many years. what is caused by a privatized war and no jobs available? no congressman, no president that can handle the generals like truman had to with his sign that said "the buck stops here." i am a republican, but i'm not proud of it at the moment. i think back to truman when he had to face macarthur, who said i'm going back to bhutan and i'm running for president and this and that. truman had the nerve to call him in and say, buddy, you are not going to do a
the country, parents understandably are scared. educators are concerned about security in schools. let's go to utah where the teachers will be getting weapons training today. and arizona's attorney general plans to have trained or principal trained with a gun inside the school. basically they're not saying they want the teachers to go roaming the halls with a gun. but this is like the last standr classroom. >> clayton: the first response are how are they going to allow guns in utah. in utah, one of the few states that allows guns in public schools, the legislature there had that state's rights, that's how they've done it for years. what the school says to your point, we don't want them roaming the halls, but it's free. we're going to waive a $50 fee on training so if you want to learn how to hold a gun, concealed weapons holder, get more training. the argument from gun advocates is they're much more able to quickly respond should some mad man come into a school than police having a swat team get there five, six, seven minutes later. >> kelly: the same thing holds true for arizona. i know wh
in 2 1/2 years. and barnes & noble chairs rallying over british publishing and education company pearson says it will invest $85.9 million in nook media in exchange for a 5% equity stake. >>> well, houston's port is a big employer and a very busy one, one of the busiest in the world, but it could be stalled by a labor strike that threatens the city, as well as more than a dozen others along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast. annise parker is the mayor of houston. mayor parker, great to have you with us. >> glad to be with you. >> your port handles about 70% of the shipping container business along the gulf coast, so this could be a major blow how will it impact your city, exactly? >> of our nine terminals, two are container terminals, and it will shut those down. 70 to 150 workers will be not showing up to work, will shut down access to those terminals now. we will continue to do business through our other terminals, but it could have a really severe and immediate impact on not just what happens at the port, but this is about cargo moving to other places. so it's everything up
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